Category Archives: MCH

Brief Notes on the Southern Historian and the Bow Tie

Brief Notes on the Southern Historian and the Bow Tie By Matthew C. Hulbert Anyone who has attended the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association in recent years can honestly—though perhaps begrudgingly, depending on whom you ask—testify to the … Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, General Commentary, MCH | Leave a comment

Southern Outlaws, Duelists, and Degenerates: Edgefield vs. Little Dixie

For those friends and acquaintances most frequently forced to “enjoy” the company of JHW and myself, this geographical duel will come as no surprise. More than one bottle of bourbon as refereed the two of us boasting which southern locality … Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, General Commentary, JHW, MCH | 3 Comments

“Lawrence? Lawrence? What was History Channel thinking, Lawrence?”

As it appears I am among the hearty few–the bravest of the brave–who sat through all two hours of History Channel’s documentary about Gettysburg last night, a few comments/questions: 1. How did we–and by “we” I mean tens of thousands … Continue reading

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Need Work: Part-Time Bushwhacker

Need Work: Part-Time Bushwhacker By Matthew C. Hulbert Imagine this scene. A group of well-armed (that is, to the teeth) men methodically approach the dimly lit home of an alleged Unionist in rural Missouri. The exact plot of land or … Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, General Commentary, MCH | 1 Comment

Pulled Pork, Arrowheads, and Doodly Squat

Pulled Pork, Arrowheads, and Doodly Squat By Matthew C. Hulbert It was 45 miles to Washington, we had a full tank of gas, no cigarettes, it wasn’t dark, and if I remember correctly, we were both wearing sunglasses. Forget the … Continue reading

Posted in Barbeque, General Commentary, MCH | 1 Comment

Taking a New Stand? Welcome to The Southern Roundtable Blog.

As financially–and perhaps culturally–bankrupted southrons struggled against the surging tide of the Depression, a gifted coterie of southern historians, poets, playwrights, and literary critics “took their stand” in 1930. At the mocking typewriter of satirist Henry Louis Mencken (and others), … Continue reading

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